Tagged: reflection

MOSAF18, Masters and everything else in between

What a summer it has been!

A wonderful mixture of teaching, training, exhibitions and getting full steam ahead once again with my Masters.

Over June and July I went along to a short course at The Photographers Gallery London (TPG – a great space if you haven’t already visited).  Part of my Masters year 1 review was that I needed to include more critical analysis in my literature review and to develop how photographic theory relates to my practice (yep I was a bit stumped too!).  What I have found studying Photography and Sociology at Masters level particularly through research is, I’ve had to develop a quick but intense way of learning.  Undertaking a Masters by Research is largely self directed learning (no lectures which is a bonus!) with some elements of knowledge sign-posted to you by your supervisors, both subjects not being my Undergrad focus has also been a nice little challenge.  The short course on ‘Photography as artistic research’ came at exactly the right time.  Led by Wiebke Leister provided weekly readings specifically on photography and the analysis and criticality to practice.  Readings focussed on such visual artists/writers as DionFlusser, Barthes, Rose, Richters.  These sessions gave me a greater understanding of the artists reasonings behind the projects, not just what they may have appeared to be on face value, using such theories from Berger and Barthes in the ways of seeing, that part of the overall understanding/appreciation of the project was mainly in the eyes of the viewer not the author, sometimes the initial intentions can be misinterpreted, not in a negative way but that ‘art’ can be a very subjective thing and varying interpretations will naturally be made by different people.  Hey but isn’t that the fun about it?

The final session provided an opportunity with the group of like minded photographers and photography enthusiasts to critique any projects we were all working on.  This is where I took along my Medway Open Studios exhibition work, which was a visual pit stop of where I was with my Masters research.

The work I presented was a mixture of archival family photographs and photographs I had taken either in response to the archive or interpretations of my need to remember my family.  These were presented in either large 16×20 black frames, or the majority in 6×4 prints in cardboard frames, assembled on a rope washing line with pegs.  I later thought of the washing line as being a private and public domestic item, where the private (items of underwear for example) become public (in the garden), this could be said for the photographs that I presented in that they are private family photographs being display in public, hanging out the laundry for all to see!

I am in the process of finalising my research title which will be on the lines of  ‘Personal Loss, Memory and the family’ this will give some context into the following feedback I received from the group:

  • they (the photos) aren’t all taken by the same person
  • it represents two sides of a family (this was the case of the Main (my maternal side) and Price (my father))
  • there are flowers at the start and end of the line (poppies)
  • the artist is remembering something
  • there are self portraits, and photos of the artist
  • there is a strong maritime link
  • there is a sequence of growing up along the photographs
  • there is a sense of growing up alone in the photographs
  • a sense of the artist being alone
  • the Facebook screen shot of the ‘missing father’ on fathers day
  • a suggestion of removing the frames, to see more of the photographs, and move from domestic to exhibition
  • a suggestion of including other members of the family to put this work together, using a red piece of string to represent the umbilical chord connecting the family
  • a suggestion of having 3 family photos within one frame to change the aesthetic (move from domestic to exhibition)

This was a great experience to have such critique from peers, especially as I was mid way through my Medway Open Studios 2018 (MOSAF18) exhibition.  For the final weekend of MOSAF18 I decided to take the suggestion of the group, and remove the photographs from the frame.  I felt a bit strange doing this as I didn’t want the photographs to become misshaped and dented by swinging freely with the peg at the top of the photo.  I know I was probably playing it too safe, protecting the photographs from damage, but I later thought this is part of the photographs journey, the photograph as a changing physical object.

MOSAF18 was very similar to that final session at TPG, in that it is always a great experience for visitors to share their thoughts and ideas on your work.  Throughout my exhibition I was pleased to see how open visitors were about sharing their experiences of family photography and artefacts following a bereavement.   I also appreciated having a small dialogue to accompany the photographs (even if it was just my oral story), the photographs became a platform that opened up that conversation.  I was conscious however to not offer up too much information about the photographs when they first arrived as I wanted to get their immediate raw responses.  To include some theory here, many of my visitors showed responses to my photograph to that of the ‘Punctum’ (as coined by Barthes), something within the photo that pierced or connected to them and evoked a memory, for example on seeing the photograph of my Grandad, one visitor commented on how the photo ‘reminded her of her father, in that he always wore shirts with high collars and a tie’.  I was quite taken in that visitors weren’t afraid to have an emotional response to my work, was this something to do with my home environment,  and I wondered would the photographs have evoked a different reaction if I had displayed them in a gallery?

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Some visitors searched for something of a ‘Familial Gaze’ (Hirsch), that familiarity in how families are represented within photographs (in contrast to the idealised portrayal of family) for example many could identify with the ‘father and new born’s home coming’ photograph (below) as typical of a familiar scene within a family album.  The same visitor appeared to combine both Hirsch and Barthes theories in connecting to the photograph and remarking how her family ‘used to have that fireplace’.  Are we automatically making connections (through links to memory) and generate understandings of our life within the act of looking at photographs?

MOSAF18 was a great experience for me, although daunting at the start, and probably was the most nervous I have been for any of my exhibitions, it has been a reaffirming experience.  I am proud that private (family) photographs help stimulate conversation about others individual experiences following a bereavement.  It is about the stories and the memories of and about those who have died, which can be an emotive subject, but my hope is that it is more about us thinking about our legacy,  the symbols, icons, objects and good memories we make now, to be left for others and cherished when we are no longer here.  I am also so thankful for those visitors who are interested in being interviewed as part of my research studies next year.

Over a few months before the summer I had the opportunity to do some informal photography teaching within a school.  It was such a privilege to share my knowledge, experience, and enthusiasm for photography with young people.  It was also a good opportunity to try out ideas for workshops with adults that I am developing this year.  The young people loved Sun printing, comic book writing and then acting out their ‘scenes’ with each other then photographing them, chalk drawing scenes and photographing themselves, making a face mosaic’s similar to the Queen project, macro photography,  ways of seeing nature (bit of a nod to Berger’s Ways of seeing there!),  and working with them to develop their own styles and thoughts about photography.  I had many thank you’s from the young people as well as some incredibly sweet conversations with some who ‘really appreciated learning about photography and will carry on taking photo’s’, this really hit home to me as my interest in photography started when I was around 7 or 8 years old.

It was so heart warming to know that my interests have gone full circle this summer in where I am now with my family photography research and leaving legacies, it starts with young people (and adults) having an interest in and being enthused by the possibilities that photography gives us for recording, making memories, remembering stories, rethinking our approach to the world.

 

 

 

Body Image my beginnings & #altogether reflection

I began taking photos of nudes as part of celebrating our bodies without photoshop in 2013, models consisted of friends and I took part also if I wasn’t prepared to be photographed in this way, how could I expect anyone else to be?

I wanted to make my models as comfortable as a possible, so in doors (whether that was at my home or theirs) under studio lights (interfit) with a plain background was my preferred shooting style.  At the beginning I think I was more obsessed with getting the lighting right, and using a ‘stock’ of gathered poses for all my models.  I was quite apprehensive to start, I’d never photographed anyone this way before, and I wanted to ensure that my models were in a safe and relaxed atmosphere.  As a photographer I think it isn’t just about the technical aspects shutter, its about rapport with the people you have in front of your camera, and a vision to be thinking of the next great shot.

I am unsure how I feel about those 2013 photos now, it was undoubtedly a great stepping stone to get me into thinking about this project more,  but that is the good thing about the start of a new project you can develop it, and it will often lead you to places you hadn’t thought of. Models volunteered for various reasons; not only as they believed in the cause; but to also visually share their journey with their body at that moment in time. It was truly humbling to hear about their stories from eating disorders, mental health and post baby body to name a few.

Not just women:  Perhaps the most prominent thing about the start of this journey was men volunteered to be included, having strong feelings about the way mens bodies can often be misrepresented in the media.  One of my favourite actors Wentworth Miller was sadly subject to a body shaming meme in 2016, this upset me with social media hounding the guy when he wasn’t feeling his strongest mentally, I needed a response to this.

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My volunteers said they were very nervous before, but after the shoot they appreciated that it was a very empowering experience.

In September 2017 my ‘Altogether’ exhibition at Sun Pier House Tea Room was in full swing.  This was a collection of pieces of positive body image, using everyday (non model) nude subjects, photographed in non-traditional places.  This exhibition seemed a natural progression for work that I have been producing since 2013, the pieces for ‘Altogether’ have been taken over the previous 18 months, and include locations such as derelict buildings, marsh land, nature reserves, and in the studio.  I want to portray an image that individuals could relate to, ‘real’ bodies without the furnishings of Photoshop or designer clothing, taking it right back to the basics of who we are fundamentally underneath, Human.  I have found this series of photographs a real balance, of ensuring the importance of the message, affirmation of my own skills, sympathetic to my subjects and the audience eye.

nikki-price-photography-male-portrait-nude“Didn’t have time to write a comment in the book but here’s some thoughts. What struck me most about your photos (apart from the lovely pictorial qualities – lighting, composition etc) was the way that the people in them seemed relaxed and confident – happy in their bodies. This gives the pictures a calm, self-contained feeling at odds with the fact that here are naked people in places where otherwise they wouldn’t normally be naked. I’m guessing that this probably comes from your relationship to them, their trust in you and your approach as a photographer. This makes the photos very different than just nude figures placed in unusual places and takes it away from what you might call “art” photography into something more personal and much more interesting.
So, just as well I didn’t have time for the comment as I seem to have written a short essay. Looking forward to where this takes you.”

-Dick Perrin Film maker and Photographer

 

“I don’t usually like photography Nikki, but love what you have done”

-Peter Reed Painter

“Nikki Price is, in my opinion, is one the major talents to emerge from the Medway scene. Her visual images show a genuine love of humanity.”
—Bill Lewis

“I’m not a model in this series but have modelled for Nikki before and can 100% confirm she is a wonderful photographer to work with, she really makes you feel at ease!”

– Charlotte

Some of the responses from the comment book from my #altogether exhibition Sun Pier House

‘Viewing the photographs still provokes old feelings that conflict’

‘Incredible honesty…amazing composition too’

‘Very rich we are so programmed’

‘Really beautiful work’

‘Beautiful poetic’

nikki-price-photography-female-portrait-nudeThank you to everyone who participated, supported, and followed my work on this topic so far.

Watch this space as there will be more on the topic of identity in the future, and next week I’ll be doing my usual yearly round up of photographs so stay tuned!

Nikki x

Since last summer……..

Fellow artist Tracie Peisley who heads up Pandora’s other Box womens artist group in Whitstable, dropped me a line recently to ask if I would like to give an update on my work since Exhibiting for the Skin project at the Horsebridge Centre in August 2016 to the group.

I had a think and decided to write a blog as I haven’t for a while, regular blog followers will know I usually do an end of year wrap up blog.  The Skin project/exhibition was a pivotal moment in my confidence in displaying work in a larger gallery, of course I have always been involved in Medway Open Studios, and submitted work for galleries before with other artists, but this point really gave me a thought of well, yep I think I can do this by myself.

I’ve had a number of commissions over the past year, and at the beginning of the year I started my research for my Masters application, which I am delighted to say I have had my interview, and been offered a place to study an MA by Research in October this year!  Exciting and scary in equal measures,  I haven’t undertaken any Higher Ed studies since my BA in 2001. Naturally I wanted to ensure a large element of the MA would include visual research, so photography, my passion, will form a large part of that.  My last MA Blog, was great to get my thoughts rolling and will be concentrating on elements of Identity through photography, including affirmations through (or not) sharing of photos on social media platforms, decisions of parents to (or not) share photographs of their children also on social media, and what (if any) effect this has on their identity.  I will be looking for individuals, and families to be involved, so if you would like to be then please drop me a line on my contact me page. Needless to say the MA will take a large proportion of my time over the next 2 years, but Nikki Price Photography will be running as usual.

I am currently in middle of Medway Open Studios #MOSAF2017 and my studio (the front room of my Victorian terrace) will be open for the final weekend 22-23rd July 11-3.  This year as with every year I try something completely new, and I have made 10 pieces exploring double or triple exposures both in camera and in Photoshop.  Many of the photographs include water, and reflections, and are quite peaceful contemplative pieces. A couple of wonderful visitors have compared one piece in particular to being like the work of Paul Nash or Peter Lanyonwhat a great compliment!  I saw Paul Nash’s work last year at the Tate, so this may have had some kind of subconscious influence.

I have also been concentrating on my ‘Altogether’ exhibition at Sun Pier House Tea Room 3-28th September 2017.  This is a collection of pieces of positive body image, using everyday (non model) nude subjects, photographed in non-traditional places.  Like my MA, this exhibition seems a natural progression for work that I have been producing since 2013, the pieces for ‘Altogether’ have been taken over the past year, and include locations such as derelict buildings, marsh land, nature reserves, and in the studio.  I want to portray an image that individuals could relate to, ‘real’ bodies without the furnishings of Photoshop or designer clothing, taking it right back to the basics of who we are fundamentally underneath, Human.  I have found this series of photographs a real balance, of ensuring the importance of the message, affirmation of my own skills, sympathetic to my subjects and the audience eye.

A great round off to this week has been shooting for Last British Dragon UK Film Company headed up by fantastic film maker James Crow.  James invited me to take photographs of the band formerly known as Bucks Fizz, The Fizz during filming their video for their come back single.  What a great day and a nice bunch.

 

Think that’s plenty to keep me busy for the moment.

Nikki

2014 Wow what a year !

Thank you to each and everyone who has supported Nikki Price Photography in 2014. I am so pleased that my little business is growing year on year.

2014 was no exception to having a real eclectic bunch of shoots, I was going to pick my top 10, however as you can probably imagine, there are far more than 10, that I have loved!

I had the pleasure of:

working with the very talented The Right Step Dance company with their Sirens of Cheetham for this years Fuse Festival

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having exclusive entry to Canterbury Prison (abandoned) before it is refurbished by Canterbury Christ Church University.

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taking photos of family Pets, lets face it everyone loves our furry friends!

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working with some wonderful Families

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growing my portfolio of events photography at such events as; Rochester Literature Festivals; cafe crawl, garden party, Talesman, poetry day at the Guildhall

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The cabaret club

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Bredhurst St Peters Project, Canterbury Christ Church University Graduation.

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participating once again in the fabulous MOSAF (Medway Open Studios) with a focus on Mindfulness

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Rochester Literature Festivals October Exhibitions, interpreting pieces of writing into photos, and taking portraits of much loved Medway artists Thomas and Clair

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my photos being included in an article about Rochester Farmers Market in ‘Medway one’ magazine

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ending the year on a high with a boggy woodland walk with Stuart Turner and the Flat Earth Society, during which I’m glad to say we found the log!

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I undertake many personal projects throughout the year that have given me great pleasure:

Mel and Julie, as well as Sam and Rachael got hitched. Little Louis’s has his naming day. My Partner Graduated, my puppy continues to amaze me with his learning and becoming the confident little woof that I know he can be, and photos for a calendar through the seasons with my niece.

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Here’s to a fabulous 2015 x

You just gotta love yourself

Over the past few months I’ve been shooting Nudes in preparation for my July Medway Open Studios Exhibition. The more I’ve done, the more fascinated I’ve become about ‘us’, about ‘people’ our aspirations, our acceptance of self and realising more and more that everything is in a constant state of flux and transition.

Feeling the way

From my exhibition shoots (and other recent nude commissions) I’ve worked with many people that are at a various state of change, transition or flux; engagement, marriage, coping with death/illness, heart break, indifference, highs, lows. We all have elements of ourselves that we aren’t happy with; curly hair, bit of a belly, too skinny, too hairy, too tall, too short, our scars, stretch marks, post baby belly, too old.

Arm and Feathers

Going through this process I’ve become more accepting of myself, as well as appreciating more that we are all fantastic and beautiful people, whose bodies are just telling a story of time, and that we should embrace this. Every person I have photographed had a story to tell about themselves, why were people more open with me during these shoots? Is ‘to be nude’ to be more thoughtful and open? All my models have all said that it had been a liberating experience, allowing them to go back to basics understanding themselves and gaining clarity in a way forward with their lives.

As Blur (in one of my favourite songs) sings:

‘And you’ve been so busy lately
That you haven’t found the time
To open up your mind
And watch the world spinning gently out of time’

So an interpretation of this song, (perhaps is to do with War), but I choose to read it as that we are so caught up in our everyday lives that we sometimes ‘need to find the time’ to become more at one with ourselves, accept who we are as time stops for no one.